May 16, 2011

Voters Overwhelmingly Opposed To Raising Taxes To Solve Nation’s Deficit Problem

After years of adding trillions of dollars to the national debt and proposing trillions more in new deficits and taxes, Democrats might want to rethink their strategy on the federal budget and mounting deficits. This morning, The Hill released a new poll that found voters overwhelmingly in support of cutting spending over raising taxes as a means of addressing the deficit.

According To The Hill’s New Poll, 45 Percent Of Voters Favor Using Spending Cuts Alone To Address The Deficit Compared With 13 Percent Who Favor An Even Split Between Taxes And Cuts. “Presented with a menu of choices to help curb the national debt and federal deficit, almost half of voters — 45 percent — support spending cuts alone, the poll indicates. By contrast, only 13 percent favor an even split between cutting spending and raising revenue through tax increases.” (Neil Stalage, “The Hill Poll: Voters Find Recession Blues Difficult To Shake,” The Hill’s “Ballot Box” Blog, 5/16/11)

By A Two-To-One Margin, Voters Said They Were Unwilling To Support A Tax Increase To Help Reduce The Debt And Deficits. “By a margin of two-to-one, respondents also said they would be unwilling to see any increase in their own tax rates even if this helped reduce the debt and deficits. Only 28 percent said they would be prepared to pay higher taxes, while 56 percent said they would not.” (Neil Stalage, “The Hill Poll: Voters Find Recession Blues Difficult To Shake,” The Hill’s “Ballot Box” Blog, 5/16/11)