Aug 6, 2015

4 More Reasons the Iran Deal is a Bad Deal

We already have many concerns about the Iran deal—at least 21 we’ve detailed in the past—but as time goes on, more concerns keep adding up. Here’s at least four more reasons why this is a bad deal:

1. Beyond the fact that international negotiators agreed to at least two secret side deals—the text of which the Obama Administration has thus far refused to share with Congress—earlier this week, we learned that only one Obama Administration official has seen the side deals, and even she has only see rough drafts. Wendy Sherman, the Administration’s lead negotiator for the deal, is the only one that has seen the known side deals deal, and she doesn’t even know everything that is being agreed to.

2. Making matters worse, reports surfaced that Iran has been refusing to allow UN inspectors to interview scientists and military officers about Iran’s covert nuclear-weapons program.  This comes on top of intelligence reports that Iran is sanitizing its nuclear military site at Parchin, using heavy machinery in an attempt to cover up past activity there. If Iran is blocking inspectors from discovering what has happened in the past, how can we trust them in the future? And if inspectors can’t overcome Iranian obstruction now, what reason is there to believe they will do so in the future?

3. The deal would be a big financial boost to Iran’s Revolutionary Guard, which not only supports terrorist and military activities around the globe, but also controls an estimated 20 percent of the Iranian economy.

4. Even top Democrats will vote against the President’s Iran agreement. Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY), who is expected to become the next Democratic leader in the Senate, and House Foreign Affairs Committee Ranking Member Eliot Engel (D-NY) have both expressed opposition to the Administration’s Iran Deal.

President Obama wants the American people to believe that this is the best possible deal we could have negotiated. Yet this Administration can’t even be sure what was negotiated, the centerpiece of the deal—the inspections regime—is already being blocked by Iran, and one of the region’s most destabilizing military forces will make a windfall when sanctions are lifted. America and our allies need something better than this, because an economically strengthened and nuclear Iran is unacceptable.

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