Sep 30, 2015

Strong and Principled Foreign Policy: Syria and ISIS

This is the sixth and final post in a series on strong a principled foreign policy. Please click here for the first, second, third,  fourth, and fifth posts.

President Obama’s decision to back down in Syria after drawing a red line caused insurmountable harm to America’s credibility abroad, and the situation was only made worse when the Administration worked with Russia on an agreement to destroy Assad’s chemical stockpiles. Unsurprisingly, Assad is still using chemical weapons against his people to this very day.

Now, we see new reports that Russia is flying missions in Syria, undoubtedly in an attempt to prop up its ally, Assad.

The Syrian civil war has far-reaching consequences, from the creation of the worst refugee crisis since World War II to allowing a breeding ground for ISIS and other radical Islamist groups.

In his speech to the Hay Initiative, Leader McCarthy outlined his plan to mitigate the chaos in Syria, including most notably working “with our allies to establish a no-fly zone over northern Syria. The ‘safe zone’ this would create could stem the flow of refugees and allow sanctuary for rebooted Syrian rebels to take on ISIS and al-Qaeda affiliated groups and prevent Assad’s attacks on his own people.

But most importantly, Leader McCarthy sought to remind people exactly what our enemy is and how we have to fight them:

“Whether it is in the form of ISIS, or al-Qaeda, or other radical Islamic movements, one thing is clear: Politically correct speech will not defeat this enemy. We must wage this war against radical Islam as if our life depended on it, because it does. They want to kill western values by bringing bloodshed to western cities. Paris, London, New York, Washington, they have all seen the face of terror funded by radical Islam.”

Ignoring problems in the world only makes the problems worse. With strong American leadership, we can reverse the growth of our adversaries and make the world safer.