This was expected. Iran pushes, the President acquiesces. The result? Iran pushes again.

The President fails to understand that our adversaries can only be stopped if America is strong and resolute. So when the President failed to respond to Iran’s multiple violations of two United Nations Security Council (UNSC) resolutions, it was only a matter of time until Iran pushed the envelope again.

This time, Iran unveiled a new underground missile depot, which violates yet another UNSC resolution. This depot can fire precision guided missiles with nuclear warheads.

We can only guess what the Administration’s response (or lack thereof) will be, but if the past is any indication, Iran will get off scot-free and the world will be less safe.

Less than a week ago, Iran launched rockets that passed a mere 1,500 yards away from a U.S. aircraft carrier in the Strait of Hormuz—a dangerous and provocative action meant to be a poke in America’s eye.

Shortly after the incident at the Strait of Hormuz and after Iran’s repeated ballistic missile tests, the Administration promised Congress that it would impose new sanctions on Iran. But then the Administration suddenly retreated, saying that new sanctions would be indefinitely delayed.

This left even Democrats and supporters of the Iran deal who have been calling for a more robust response in the lurch. Minority Whip Steny Hoyer (MD-05) said, “I am disappointed that the Administration has delayed punitive action in response to Iran’s recent ballistic missile tests,” and “Iran must know with certainty that violating U.N. Security Council resolutions… will be met with serious consequences.”

Another Democratic deal supporter, Delaware Senator Chris Coons, said that if we don’t have “vigorous enforcement that pushes back on Iran’s bad behavior” we “invite Iran to cheat.”

But President Obama doesn’t seem interested in enforcement. Instead, he only seems interested in buying off the Iranians to keep them locked into a deal in which they already beat us.

President Obama is so obsessed with having good relations with Iran that he is willing to endure Iran’s repeated demonstrations of bad faith in an attempt to uphold a nuclear agreement that depends on Iran’s good faith. The problem is obvious: For this bad deal to be upheld, Iran has to adhere to international agreements. But Iran’s continual violations of other international agreements prove that the Iran nuclear deal isn’t even worth the paper it is written on.

The only thing that will keep Iran in line is a strong American response. But for that, we need a strong American president.