Daily Leader
HOUSE MEETS AT: FIRST VOTE PREDICTED: LAST VOTE PREDICTED:
10:00 a.m.: Morning Hour
12:00 p.m.: Legislative Business

Fifteen “One Minutes”
1:00 – 2:00 p.m. 3:45 – 4:45 p.m.
 
H.Res. 1059 – Rule providing for consideration of both H.R. 3798 – Save American Workers Act of 2017 (Rep. Walorski – Ways and Means) and Conference Report to Accompany H.R. 5895 – Energy and Water, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act, 2019 (Rep. Simpson – Appropriations) (One hour of debate).  The Rules Committee has recommended one Rule which would provide for consideration of two measures.

For H.R. 3798, the Rules Committee has recommended a closed Rule that provides for one hour of general debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Energy and Commerce.  The Rule allows one motion to recommit, with or without instructions, and waives all points of order against the legislation. 

For the Conference Report to Accompany H.R. 5895, the Rules Committee has allowed debate on the conference report be divided pursuant to clause 8(d) of Rule XXII.  The Rule allows one motion to recommit and waives all points of order against the conference report and against its consideration. Members are urged to VOTE NO.

Conference Report to Accompany H.R. 5895 – Energy and Water, Legislative Branch, and Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act, 2019 (Rep. Simpson – Appropriations) (One hour of debate).  This Conference Report contains $146.6 billion in base discretionary appropriations for three FY19 appropriations bills – Energy and Water Appropriations Act, Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, and Military Construction and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act – with an additional $921 million in additional discretionary appropriations designated for Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) under the Military Construction and Veterans Affairs division.  These funding levels are consistent with the budget deal enacted in February.


The Energy and Water Appropriations division (Division A) contains $44.64 billion in base discretionary appropriations – a $1.44 billion increase from the 2018 enacted level.  This Conference Report allocates $1.16 billion above the enacted level for Department of Energy programs, for a total of $35.69 billion for DOE, which includes: $7.18 billion for environmental cleanup programs; $1.949 billion for Nuclear Nonproliferation programs; $2.38 billion for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; $366 million for ARPA-E; $276 million for activities related to the electricity grid, including cybersecurity; and numerous other provisions.  For the Army Corps of Engineers, $6.999 billion – an increase of $171.5 million from the 2018 enacted level – is allocated for various projects including: investigations, construction, operations maintenance, and the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund.  The Conference Report contains $1.565 billion for water resource projects including conservation, reuse, reclamation, drought activities, and rural water projects. 

Division A does NOT include provisions related to: Waters of the U.S.; the prohibition of funds for certain operations of the Federal Columbia River Power System to prevent additional spill at dams on the Columbia and Lower Snake Rivers for fish passage of ESA-listed salmon; the prohibition of the Bureau of Reclamation from purchasing water in the State of California to supplement flow within a river basin; language allowing guns to be carried on Corps of Engineers lands; and the prohibition of funds to develop a National Ocean Policy.

The Legislative Branch Appropriations division (Division B) contains $4.836 billion in base discretionary appropriations – a $136 million increase from the 2018 enacted level.  This Conference Report maintains a Member pay freeze through 2019, but increases the Members Representation Allowance (MRA) by approximately $11 million – for a total of $573.6 million.  Division B proposes a $1.37 million increase for the Office of Compliance (OOC) – bringing it to a total of $633 million.  Regarding security related increases, $1.257 billion has been allocated to fund the operations of the House, which includes improvements in IT and cybersecurity enhancements, and a $29.8 million increase for the Capitol Police, bringing Capitol Police funding to $456.3 million.  $8.8 million in new funding is provided to pay Congressional Interns (up to $20,000 per office per calendar year).  The Conference Report also eliminates the Office of the Former Speaker which allowed former Speakers to receive an office and budget for five years upon their retirement from Congress.  Under this division, $174,000 for a death gratuity payment is provided for the family of Senator John McCain.

The Military Construction and Veterans Affairs division (Division C) contains $97.086 billion in base discretionary appropriations – an increase of $5.095 billion from the 2018 enacted level – and $921 million in OCO funding – an increase of $171 million from the 2018 enacted level.  This Conference Report provides $10.332 billion – an increase of $241 million from the 2018 enacted level – for Military Construction programs, including: funding for active and reserve components; $1.583 for Family Housing construction; $342 million for the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) program; $193.4 million for the Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment Program (ERCIP); and $100 million in additional funds for enhancing security and safety programs at military installations.  The Conference Report provides $86.487 billion – an increase of $5 billion more than the 2018 enacted level – for Veterans Affairs related programs, including: $75.6 billion in advance appropriations for VA medical services; $1.84 billion for medical services for FY2019; $779 million for Medical and Prosthetic Research; $1.127 billion for Construction Major Projects; over $4.1 billion for VA Information Technology improvements; $2 billion as part of the second installment for improvements in the VA infrastructure; $1.1 billion for activities related to the development and rollout of Electronic Health Records (EHR); $8.6 billion for Mental Health Funding and Suicide Prevention; and $348 million for opioid treatment and prevention programs. 

This Conference Report contains Democratic priorities in all three divisions, while excluding numerous poison pill riders.

Suspensions (4 bills)
  1. House Amendment to S. 3021 – America's Water Infrastructure Act of 2018 (Sen. Klobuchar – Transportation and Infrastructure)
  2. H.R. 6227 – National Quantum Initiative Act, as amended (Rep. Smith (TX) – Science, Space, and Technology)
  3. Concurring in the Senate Amendment to H.R. 589 – Department of Energy Research and Innovation Act of 2017 (Rep. Smith (TX) – Science, Space, and Technology)
  4. S. 97 – Nuclear Energy Innovation Capabilities Act of 2017 (Sen. Crapo – Science, Space, and Technology)
Postponed Suspension (1 bill)
  1. H.R. 1911 – Special Envoy to Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism Act of 2018, as amended (Rep. Smith (NJ) – Foreign Affairs)
TOMORROW’S OUTLOOK

The GOP Leadership has announced the following schedule for Friday, September 14: Upon passage of the Conference Report to Accompany H.R. 5895 – votes are no longer expected on Friday, September 14th. 
 
THE DAILY QUOTE
“Congressional Republicans spent much of the Obama administration decrying deficits and forcing restrictions on spending. They largely abandoned those sentiments when Trump took office… Taken together, the tax cuts and new spending levels are expected to add more than $5 trillion to the debt over the next decade, according to the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, a nonpartisan organization that advocates for budget discipline… [Rep. Kevin] Brady [R-TX] and other Republicans have defended the push for tax cuts, saying it will help the economy and dismissing reports of its impact on the debt. This viewpoint, though, is disputed by many economists, including those at the Congressional Budget Office and the Joint Committee on Taxation, which have found that the tax cuts will add more than $1 trillion to the debt.”

    -     Washington Post, 9/11/2018