Daily Leader
HOUSE MEETS AT: FIRST VOTE PREDICTED: LAST VOTE PREDICTED:
10:00 a.m.: Morning Hour
12:00 p.m.: Legislative Business

Fifteen “One Minutes”
1:30 – 2:30 p.m. 4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
 
H.Res. 762 – Rule providing for consideration of H.R. 1917 – Blocking Regulatory Interference from Closing Kilns Act of 2017 (Rep. Johnson (OH) – Energy and Commerce) and H.R. 1119 – Satisfying Energy Needs and Saving the Environment Act (Rep. Rothfus – Energy and Commerce) (One hour of debate).  The Rules Committee has recommended one Rule which would provide for consideration of two bills.

For H.R. 1917, the Rules Committee has recommended a closed Rule that provides for one hour of general debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Energy and Commerce.  The Rule allows one motion to recommit, with or without instructions, and waives all points of order against the legislation.

For H.R. 1119, the Rules Committee has recommended a closed Rule that provides for one hour of general debate equally divided and controlled by the Chair and Ranking Member of the Committee on Energy and Commerce.  The Rule allows one motion to recommit, with or without instructions, and waives all points of order against the legislation.  Members are urged to VOTE NO.


H.R. 1917  – Blocking Regulatory Interference from Closing Kilns Act of 2017 (Rep. Johnson (OH) – Energy and Commerce)(One hour of debate).  The bill would prohibit the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from implementing two 2015 final Clean Air Act rules governing the emissions of air pollutants: the Brick and Structural Clay Products rule and the final Clay Ceramics Manufacturing rule (known as the Brick and Clay MACTs).  H.R. 1917 would delay implementation of these rules until ligation related to the rules is completed, “judgment becomes final, and (is) no longer subject to further appeal or review.”  This legislation would supplant the judicial process for Congressional judgment.  Currently, the brick industry is challenging the Brick and Clay MACTs in court, but has not sought an injunction to delay the rules.

The Rules Committee print of H.R. 1917 also incorporates the text of H.R. 453, the Relief from New Source Performance Standards Act, which delays implementation of EPA’s emissions standards for wood stoves and other wood-fueled heaters until 2023. The delay unfairly punishes those companies that have already invested to produce cleaner, more efficient compliant products by the original EPA deadline. And, it allows less efficient, dirtier operating products to remain on the market and in operation for decades into the future.

The House considered similar legislation in March of 2016.  That vote can be found
here.

 
Bill Text for H.R. 1917:
PDF Version

Background for H.R. 1917:

TOMORROW’S OUTLOOK

The GOP Leadership has announced the following schedule for Thursday, March 8: The House will meet at 9:00 a.m. for legislative business.  The House is expected to complete consideration of H.R. 1119 – Satisfying Energy Needs and Saving the Environment Act (Rep. Rothfus – Energy and Commerce).
 
THE DAILY QUOTE
“But the result [of the GOP tax law] has hardly been a windfall, economically or politically…. Few are complaining, but the working class here is not feeling flush with newfound wealth. And some are convinced that what the tax cut has given them upfront will ultimately fade. ‘He’s pulling out jazz hands and shiny stuff up front and will screw us on the back end,’ said Brian Barkalow, a worker at Requarth Lumber…. Several said they were most concerned about the rising cost of health care, and others questioned whether getting more money now would mean paying more later…. Mr. [Brandon] Eifert said he was anxious that a tax cut now might mean that he would not get a refund next year. ‘Is the tax break just giving you the money now instead of later?’ he asked…. ‘It’s always nice to get a few more dollars in the pocket,’ Mr. [Dan] Marker said. But, he added, ‘probably my bigger concern here is that if Washington cuts taxes, fine, what services are they going to do without?’… Al Yarcho, 63, who has been retired for five years, is not a beneficiary of the tax cut, but he expressed worry about its consequences for the nation’s finances and entitlement programs. ‘I just know this,’ Mr. Yarcho said. ‘When you cut revenue, you either have to find new revenue streams or you have to cut expenses. They’ve covered all the cuts. How are you going to pay for it?’”

    -     New York Times, 3/7/2018